Apostolis’ and Rena’s cafeneion, ouzeri and fish taverna in Scala Loutron

View from the taverna. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

View from the taverna at Scala Loutron. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

When I was on the island of Lesbos earlier this week, I came across a little beach-side taverna that was full of delights. It didn’t look much, but the fish and seafood was excellent.

Octopus drying in the sun. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

Octopus drying in the sun. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

We chanced to find it when we were looking for a beach. As it happened, we didn’t go in the sea there because we got distracted by the Samara ouzo, which is definitely one of my favourites now. I hadn’t tried it before – very remiss of me!

Outside wall decorations.Photo Nikos Kapsalis

Outside wall decorations.Photo Nikos Kapsalis

The octopus you see in the photo above had been washed in the washing machine. This is Apostolis’ way of tenderising it. Traditionally men used to catch their octopus and bash it on the rocks to do this. Using the washing machine is certainly less strenuous!

How welcoming is this? Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

How welcoming is this? Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

The wall decorations above were sea creatures that either washed up on the beach, or were caught in nets. There are sea horses, starfish, shells and other curiosities. The side of the taverna is shady and a welcome change from the sunny front of this taverna.

Fireplace for winter use. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

Fireplace for winter use. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

As darkness fell, the lights inside the taverna were switched on and gave the room a cosy, rosy glow. It must be wonderfully warm to sit by the fireplace in the winter. There was a conversation with Apostolis as to whether he should buy plastic sheets to shelter the outside tables in the winter. The comment was that it didn’t matter because everyone would be inside, trying to get close to the fire!

The well-stocked bar! Credit Nikos Kapsalis

The well-stocked bar! Credit Nikos Kapsalis

There is nothing I like better than a well-stocked bar, full of ouzo, tsipourou and so on. This taverna is really clean and the food is very fresh. Vegetables grow in the garden behind the taverna; you pass these as you go to the toilets. Women need to get the key to these from Rena. I had forgotten about this custom, but luckily my friend takes care of things like this!

A seemingly abandoned fishing boat, home to cats. Credit Nikos Kapsalis

A seemingly abandoned fishing boat, home to cats. Credit Nikos Kapsalis

There’s nothing quite like a traditional taverna for a warm welcome and conversation. Then of course, there are the cats. We asked Apostolis how many cats he feeds around the taverna. The answer was “23”, and I’d guess he and his wife have names for all of them!

The sign above the taverna in Scala Loutron. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

The sign above the taverna in Scala Loutron. Photo credit Nikos Kapsalis

This sign (above) is a very welcoming sight after negotiating the winding road down to the beach and taverna.

Cat posing and waiting for a fishy treat. Credit Nikos Kapsalis

Cat posing and waiting for a fishy treat. Credit Nikos Kapsalis

One of the 23 cats just couldn’t stop posing for the camera! They were all friendly, of course, because we were eating fish. This is a great taverns, and if you are on Lesvos you really should try to find it. it’s worth the effort!

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About lynnee8

I have travelled extensively both for business (I am a teacher and teacher-trainer of English as a Foreign Language) and pleasure. I have just come back from Pakistan where I lived for 4 years. I love Greece and have lived there for more than 10 years although not all at one time.
This entry was posted in eating and drinking, Greece, Travel and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Apostolis’ and Rena’s cafeneion, ouzeri and fish taverna in Scala Loutron

  1. Pingback: Cats, Dogs and Greeks | Writing and Travel

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